Six on Saturday

Having spent the last few days wondering if three or three and half on Saturday would pass muster I finally knuckled down and came up with six.  It may sound as though it’s an onerous task to post weekly.  But no,  I am enjoying the discipline of looking at the garden in a focused way.  It may even be making me a more productive gardener!

One


A week or so ago I succumbed to this impulse buy from a supermarket.  Of course, when I arrived home I thought where on earth am I going to plant them?  Their pretty little viola faces seemed rather dwarfed once positioned in the garden.  This week serendipity struck.  I remembered I had three neglected terracotta troughs.  I think they will be just right for some block planting and then I can place them along one side of a raised bed.  Perfect.

Two

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Inspired by a tweet from Waterperry Gardens in Oxfordshire I am sharing with you my borders in February.  First is the border that was extended in November.  The line of snowdrops and emerging daffodils under the hedge shows where the old border ended.  They will be moved to the front after flowering.  The roses were planted in November: three Darcy Bussell and a Jaqueline du Pre.  Perhaps now I need an artistic rose to complete the cultural theme.

Three

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This is my long border. As you can see the foxes/squirrels love spreading the mulch around.  I have used roses and euphorbia as the framework and I am filling in around them with astrantia, gernaniums, scabious, penstemon and a variety of annuals. The borders at Waterperry are famous for their careful staking of plants.  Here’s a tip from Pat Havers, Head Gardener there.  They start staking their perennials in April.  I always leave my staking until it’s too late.  This year I will do better.

Four

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Hedges.  The background to the new border is a mixed hedge.  Elaeaganus, bay and viburnum.  I like the bay and viburnum but I would love to replace the elaeaganus with a darker green hedge to give a stronger background to the foreground plants.  Sometimes you have to garden with what you have.

Five

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Last week I mentioned that I prefer primula vulgaris to the stronger coloured primroses appearing in the nurseries.  The brightly coloured versions add colour at this time of year but the pale yellow of the common primrose is always the winner for me.  I grow them in my spring corner.  First the primroses and snowdrops appear, followed by anemones, bluebells and aquilegia and then I am hoping last October’s planting of pheasant eye narcissus will steal the show.

Six

And lastly, the February issue of Gardeners World came to my rescue.  Mint is beginning to come through now and they suggest breaking up small clumps of it to pot up for the greenhouse.   This will give an earlier crop.  The perfect job for the weekend.

There’s a cold spell ahead and it’s a gloomy day today, but there is always something to enjoy.  I hope you find time to garden or to reflect on your garden this weekend.  It’s a lovely thing to do.  More international gardening thoughts can be found at The Propagator who hosts this meme.

 

 

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Six on Saturday

Thanks so much to everyone who gave me advice on the Euphorbia.  The RHS thought it might be poorly because of root rot due to wetness and also suggested, as others mentioned, cutting back the sad stems when the new growth comes through in spring which might persuade it to regenerate.  I think it might have picked up a little in the past week so I am going to remain optimistic.  Here’s my six for this week.

One

Geranium sanguineum var. striatum.  These were making such a good show on a visit to Waterperry Gardens, Oxfordshire in June that I bought some for myself.  They have established well and this pink flower shone out on a gloomy day this week.  Don’t know why it’s also known as Bloody Cranesbill, seems quite inoffensive to me.

Two

Some small scale seed sowing and propagation has taken place.  I finally potted on some of the Nigella damascena seeds which were collected from plants growing at the allotment.  I also collected some sweet pea seeds from the summer flowering.  They have just germinated.  It was a spur of the moment thing as I unentwined them from their supports.  I put them in a pot and hoped.  So far so good. Next in the row are the penstemon cuttings taken in August.  I took four, four rooted and so far four are growing on.  One was a little thin on the root growth but it seems to be making progress.  I should have taken more cuttings as an insurance policy.

Three

This aster is eye popping in the border where the colour is actually a little more subtle than this photo shows.  It’s another purchase from the Finchley Horticultural Society plant sale.  Who needs Chelsea? The cosmos is still flowering but in preparation for storm Ophelia I did cut back some of the larger stems for flowers for the house.

Four 

Some autumnal mushrooms have arrived in the garden.  Plants for free, yes.  But I’m not sure about food for free.  I don’t know anything about mushrooms so I will leave them where they are.  Something seems to be enjoying them, I suspect squirrels but could it be the birds?

Five 

Some golden leaves from the fig tree.  The colours are turning and the leaves falling but these figs aren’t going to ripen in this garden.

Six

My last one for the week is this climbing rose, Blush Noisette.  Beautiful soft pink flowers and hopefully many more to come.  It is growing up a south facing wall and it will be interesting to see how long this micro climate will help keep it flowering.

I hope your garden to continues to flower and be fruitful.  Thanks to The Propagator for hosting the wonderful Six on Saturday.  Read his blog posts and all the other Six on Saturday posts from around the world at The Propagator my plant obsession