Six On Saturday: Farewell to February

Thanks for the extra day. Thanks for more rain and wind. Thanks Jorge. It’s all a bit much and I’m not even flooded out. I am so sorry for those who are, the photos are terrible and the real thing must be so much worse. I am encouraged by the fact that this is the last day of meteorological winter and spring arrives tomorrow. In theory. Here’s six gardening related things.

One

March is the time to start a few seeds going.  First on my list and  a first for me, is trying to grow some dahlias from seed.  I collected the seed from ‘Orange Cushion’ that was new to the garden last year.  I liked it so I am having a go at growing from seed and if that fails I might have a go at taking some cuttings from the tubers later in the year.  If the tubers have survived.  I left them in the ground and although the weather has been mild the constant rain might have done for them,

Two

 

Lupin seeds collected from last year’s plants. I am starting these and the dahlia seeds off inside the house as the greenhouse has no heat or electricity supply.  Indeed the greenhouse is very leaky at the moment and I feel sure the pools of water on the floor can’t be the best environment for the overwintering plants.

Three

The sun is out so I’m off to the garden for more photos!  Some time later: The fig tree was pruned a few weeks ago but I was so excited by primroses, pulmonaria and such like that I didn’t show it.  Hey, Mr P I also have wood chip! This the large fig tree that shades much of the long border in the summer.  The height was reduced by a third and next year it will get another third taken off.  I’ll lose the fruit this year but it needed to taken in hand.

Four

The mild weather seems to have suited the salvia ‘Amistad’.  I took cuttings as a precaution against the garden plants dying off over winter but so far they have survived outside and are putting on new growth.  I think they will need a cut back to some strong growing points.

Five

The first cowslip is just about in flower.  These grow in the damp border. A small border that is guaranteed to be wetter than the rest of the garden and today there is standing water.  This should be perfect for the Siberian irises that grow there as well.

Six 

Oh dear. It looks like I’ve missed the moment to cut back the grasses.  When did they start sprouting? These are the melica altisssima ‘Alba’ that were planted in the north border last year.

I’m hoping for a dry day tomorrow as I have some free time.  Seeds to be sown, more FBB to be sprinkled around but it may be too soggy to tackle those weeds.  We shall see.  The Propagator will miraculously host this meme, comment on posts and have time to garden I am sure.  He may also throw in a long run.  All hail the Caesar!

21 thoughts on “Six On Saturday: Farewell to February

  1. I hope you do well with your dahlia seeds – that’s all to advanced for me – but good luck I hope it works for you.

    Ahh, your greenhouse sounds just like mine. Husband has been out with some silicone to try to stop water getting in – but I’m still having to work in there with a waxed hat on my head! My greenhouse is also unheated, and I fully agree with that comment about the pools of water on the floor.

    Love your fig tree – and the lovely blue sky, my goodness we haven’t seen much blue this month!

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  2. Nice cowslip. You have now got me wondering when they flower in the wild. I recall seeing them in June on the coast, well over flowering and in seed, but surely they wouldn’t have flowered this early? Well I’m not venturing there until this wind has calmed down! I’m thinking April possibly. And how wonderful to see that blue sky!

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    • Yes, I think I’ll just have to do the best I can with the grasses. I had the fig cut back quite a lot because it really is a big tree and it hadn’t had a proper prune in three years. It was getting quite dominant. It will be interesting to see how much growth it puts on this year.

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  3. I chopped down my Amistad a few weeks ago, as it looked a bit straggly, but there’s a house nearby where their Amistad’s in a shelter place & it’s been in full leaf all winter. That’s one impressive fig tree. And good luck w/the seeds, especially the dahlia. We wait for results.

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  4. Your fig tree is huge! I’m wondering how you protect the figs from birds. The pruning looks very nice though.
    Good luck with the seed growing. I am going to try some species tulips from seed this year, something I haven’t done before.

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    • The previous owner left some very large nets which were mainly used to stop the squirrels climbing up the trunk. It was a losing battle so last year I didn’t bother to net and we still had enough for our needs. Good luck with the species tulips, they will be magnificent.

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  5. Does your fig tree produce only early figs? Most produce twice. Those that produce best early get pruned less because early figs develop on last years growth. Those that produce best late get pruned more aggressively because late figs develop on current years growth. Most get pruned lightly, to produce both early and late fruit. Anyway, your tree seems to have a few stems from last year, so might make a few early figs. Otherwise, if it did not make many late figs before, it might this year.

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    • I do get two crops from the tree but the second crop doesn’t come through until October and the weather here just isn’t good enough to ripen them well. We get enough from the summer crop to enjoy them despite being in competition with birds and squirrels.

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      • For this year, you can find out if aggressive pruning accelerates the second crop enough to ripen. I have grown several cultivars, and there are some that I still have not figured out. I know honey figs do best with minimal pruning, but I prune mine anyway just because it would otherwise get so big. I get plenty of late figs, but they are not as good as the early figs.

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